April 8th, 2014
issahessa:

The narrow streets of Pompeii…

issahessa:

The narrow streets of Pompeii…

(via galatea-wannabe)

ancientpeoples:

Earring in the shape of a fish
2nd Century AD
Roman
(Source: The British Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Earring in the shape of a fish

2nd Century AD

Roman

(Source: The British Museum)

April 4th, 2014
April 1st, 2014
ancientart:

A quick look at: Acueducto de los Milagros, Mérida, Spain.
This Roman aqueduct was dubbed Acueducto de los Milagros ("Miraculous Aqueduct") by the inhabitants of Mérida for the fact that it was still standing, and for the ewe that it evoked. 
This aqueduct was located in the Roman colony of Emerita Augusta (present day Mérida), which was founded by Augustus Caesar in 25 BC. The construction of the aqueduct itself is thought to have taken place during the 1st century AD, with later construction or renovations occurring around 300 AD. 
The structure was built to supply water to Emerita Augusta. This water was originally brought to the city from Lago de Proserpina -a reservoir which was fed by the Las Pardillas stream, about 5km north-west of Mérida. 38 pillars which stand 25 metres high along some 830 metres remains today. The structure is constructed from opus mixtum. 
The Romans constructed aqueducts to supply water from distant sources to their towns and cities, supplying public baths, private households, etc. Water was moved by the aqueducts through gravity, the aqueducts were built on an ever-so-slight downward gradient. This diagram is useful in showing how Roman aqueducts worked. 
Photo courtesy & taken by Jane Drumsara.

ancientart:

A quick look at: Acueducto de los MilagrosMérida, Spain.

This Roman aqueduct was dubbed Acueducto de los Milagros ("Miraculous Aqueduct") by the inhabitants of Mérida for the fact that it was still standing, and for the ewe that it evoked. 

This aqueduct was located in the Roman colony of Emerita Augusta (present day Mérida), which was founded by Augustus Caesar in 25 BC. The construction of the aqueduct itself is thought to have taken place during the 1st century AD, with later construction or renovations occurring around 300 AD.

The structure was built to supply water to Emerita Augusta. This water was originally brought to the city from Lago de Proserpina -a reservoir which was fed by the Las Pardillas stream, about 5km north-west of Mérida. 38 pillars which stand 25 metres high along some 830 metres remains today. The structure is constructed from opus mixtum

The Romans constructed aqueducts to supply water from distant sources to their towns and cities, supplying public baths, private households, etc. Water was moved by the aqueducts through gravity, the aqueducts were built on an ever-so-slight downward gradient. This diagram is useful in showing how Roman aqueducts worked. 

Photo courtesy & taken by Jane Drumsara.

March 10th, 2014

ancientart:

Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa, Hunedoara, Romania.

The largest, and capital city of Roman Dacia, this city was founded by Terentius Scaurianus about 108-110, during the reign of Roman emperor Hadrian.

Situated less than 50km away from the former capital of the Dacians, Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa was built on a strategic point  between where the battle of the Dacian troops and Roman legions took place. This site is on the ground of what was a camp of the Fifth Macedonian Legion, and was settled by veterans of the Dacian wars.

Later destroyed by the Goths, this large cosmopolitan centre remains in ruins today. The site features temples, gladiator schools, a large forum, and an amphitheater.

While researching this site I also found these virtual reconstructions of what features of this site would have once looked like:

Photos taken by Codrinb.

March 5th, 2014
archaicwonder:

Timgad, Algeria
Timgad was founded ex nihilo as a military colony by the Emperor Trajan around AD 100. It was intended to serve, primarily, as a bastion against the Berbers in the nearby Aures Mountains. It was originally populated largely by Parthian veterans of the Roman army who were granted lands in return for years of service. The ruins are noteworthy for representing one of the best extant examples of the grid plan as used in Roman city planning.
Located at the intersection of six roads, the city was walled but not fortified. Originally designed for a population of around 15,000, the city quickly outgrew its original specifications and spilled beyond the orthogonal grid in a more loosely organized fashion.
The city enjoyed a peaceful existence for the first several hundred years and became a center of Christian activity starting in the 3rd century, and a Donatist center in the 4th century. In the 5th century, the city was sacked by the Vandals before falling into decline. In AD 535 the Byzantine general Solomon found the city when he came to occupy it. In the following century, the city was briefly repopulated as a primarily Christian city before being sacked by Berbers in the 7th century and being abandoned.
Because no new settlements were founded on the site after the 7th century, sacking, it was partially preserved under sand up to a depth of approximately one meter until it was excavated in 1881. The encroachment of the Sahara on the ruins was the principal reason why the town is so well preserved. The site of Timgad is located about 22 miles east of the town of Batna in the Aures Mountains of Algeria.

archaicwonder:

Timgad, Algeria

Timgad was founded ex nihilo as a military colony by the Emperor Trajan around AD 100. It was intended to serve, primarily, as a bastion against the Berbers in the nearby Aures Mountains. It was originally populated largely by Parthian veterans of the Roman army who were granted lands in return for years of service. The ruins are noteworthy for representing one of the best extant examples of the grid plan as used in Roman city planning.

Located at the intersection of six roads, the city was walled but not fortified. Originally designed for a population of around 15,000, the city quickly outgrew its original specifications and spilled beyond the orthogonal grid in a more loosely organized fashion.

The city enjoyed a peaceful existence for the first several hundred years and became a center of Christian activity starting in the 3rd century, and a Donatist center in the 4th century. In the 5th century, the city was sacked by the Vandals before falling into decline. In AD 535 the Byzantine general Solomon found the city when he came to occupy it. In the following century, the city was briefly repopulated as a primarily Christian city before being sacked by Berbers in the 7th century and being abandoned.

Because no new settlements were founded on the site after the 7th century, sacking, it was partially preserved under sand up to a depth of approximately one meter until it was excavated in 1881. The encroachment of the Sahara on the ruins was the principal reason why the town is so well preserved. The site of Timgad is located about 22 miles east of the town of Batna in the Aures Mountains of Algeria.

March 2nd, 2014
February 28th, 2014
archaicwonder:

The famous ‘Elephant Denarius’ of Julius Caesar, struck in a traveling mint, c. 49-48 BC
On the obverse is a group of religious symbols including a simpulum (libation ladle), an aspergillum (implement used to sprinkle holy water), an axe surmounted by a wolf’s head, and an apex (hat). On the reverse, an Elephant advancing right, trampling on a horned serpent, CAESAR inscription below.
It is estimated that 22 million of these were minted, making them the third most minted coin of the Roman Republic and enough to pay eight legions. This coin coincides with the time when Caesar took gold and silver bouillon from the Temple of Saturn treasury in Rome, which is likely the source of the metals used in this coinage.
It has been suggested that Caesar’s use of the elephant was intended to humiliate the self-important Pompey, who had tried to associate himself with Alexander the Great by riding one of Alexander’s symbols, the elephant, in his triumphal procession. Pompey had embarrassingly failed to fit the beast into the city.
The religious symbols associate Caesar with his prestigious pontifical position as the head of Rome’s religious hierarchy. Caesar had been Pontifex Maximus since 63 BC.

archaicwonder:

The famous ‘Elephant Denarius’ of Julius Caesar, struck in a traveling mint, c. 49-48 BC

On the obverse is a group of religious symbols including a simpulum (libation ladle), an aspergillum (implement used to sprinkle holy water), an axe surmounted by a wolf’s head, and an apex (hat). On the reverse, an Elephant advancing right, trampling on a horned serpent, CAESAR inscription below.

It is estimated that 22 million of these were minted, making them the third most minted coin of the Roman Republic and enough to pay eight legions. This coin coincides with the time when Caesar took gold and silver bouillon from the Temple of Saturn treasury in Rome, which is likely the source of the metals used in this coinage.

It has been suggested that Caesar’s use of the elephant was intended to humiliate the self-important Pompey, who had tried to associate himself with Alexander the Great by riding one of Alexander’s symbols, the elephant, in his triumphal procession. Pompey had embarrassingly failed to fit the beast into the city.

The religious symbols associate Caesar with his prestigious pontifical position as the head of Rome’s religious hierarchy. Caesar had been Pontifex Maximus since 63 BC.

(via fuckyeahancientclassics)

cmsolberg:

Villa Adriana. Tivoli. 

(via ancientromebuildings)

February 20th, 2014

lapetitesauvageonne:

Ruins of Baalbek in the snow (Temple of Jupiter)

Photo cred: AFP

(Source: , via garguillian)

February 19th, 2014

pompeii + wall painting details / july 2013

(Source: daeenerys, via golemette)

February 18th, 2014

ancientart:

Baths of the Forum, Pompeii, 1895 survey expedition photographs.

After the earthquake of A.D. 62, these baths were the only ones in Pompeii still functioning, and were not severely damaged. Built not long after the establishment of Sulla’s colony in 80 B.C., these baths are relatively small, and would likely have been very overcrowded. 

Photos courtesy Brooklyn Museum Archives, Goodyear Archival Collection.

(via hehasawifeyouknow)

February 16th, 2014

irefiordiligi:

The Painted Garden of the Villa di Livia, Prima Porta, Rome
This lush painted garden covered the walls of a semi-subterranean chamber, probably a cool triclinium (dining room) for summer banquets, in the suburban Villa of Livia Drusilla, the wife of  the Emperor Augustus.
This Second style fresco, the most ancient example of continuous garden painting (30 - 20 BCE), presents a variety of plants and birds rendered in a naturalistic way.

(via cerberusia)

February 15th, 2014
ancientart:

Mars of Todi, Etruscan.

This is one of the very rare objects of ancient Italic statuary that has survived to our time. It shows a warrior dressed in armour and, originally, with a helmet, portrayed in the act of performing a libation before battle, pouring the liquid contained in a particular form of cup (patera) held by the extended right hand, while with the left he leans on an iron spear (the patera and remains of the spear, not visible in the photo, are in the showcase).
The statue, which betrays the influence of Greek art starting from the middle of the 5th cent. BC, was found in Todi buried between slabs of Travertine, perhaps after having been hit by lightning. The dedicatory inscription, in the language of the ancient Umbrians but in the Etruscan alphabet, recalls that the statue was given as a gift (dunum dede) by a certain Ahal Trutitis. (vatican)

Courtesy & currently located at the Museo Gregoriano Etrusco, Musei Vaticani, Vatican, Rome. Photo taken by Nick Thompson.

ancientart:

Mars of Todi, Etruscan.

This is one of the very rare objects of ancient Italic statuary that has survived to our time. It shows a warrior dressed in armour and, originally, with a helmet, portrayed in the act of performing a libation before battle, pouring the liquid contained in a particular form of cup (patera) held by the extended right hand, while with the left he leans on an iron spear (the patera and remains of the spear, not visible in the photo, are in the showcase).

The statue, which betrays the influence of Greek art starting from the middle of the 5th cent. BC, was found in Todi buried between slabs of Travertine, perhaps after having been hit by lightning. The dedicatory inscription, in the language of the ancient Umbrians but in the Etruscan alphabet, recalls that the statue was given as a gift (dunum dede) by a certain Ahal Trutitis. (vatican)

Courtesy & currently located at the Museo Gregoriano Etrusco, Musei Vaticani, Vatican, Rome. Photo taken by Nick Thompson.

(via romegreeceart)

February 6th, 2014

the-mosaic-project:

            This pavement mosaic resides at the Museo Nazionale at Palazzo Massimo alle Terme, along with scores of other beautifully preserved floor mosaics.  This particular mosaic dates to the 2nd century and features a gorgeous Nilotic scene that was a typical subject for both pavement mosaics and wall frescos.  There is a very famous mosaic from Palestrina that features a very detailed and complex Nilotic scene. These scenes were “common throughout the Mediterranean from the later Hellenistic period through the Roman Empire, depicting the Nile in flood. The protagonists of Nilotic scenes are often dark-skinned pygmies or dwarfs who do battle with hippopotami and crocodiles or engage in sexual activity” (Barrett, abstract).  In this mosaic, we see that the pygmies are engaged in hunting the hippopotami, but are generally avoiding the crocodile.  Interestingly, on the right side of the pavement, a pygmy has deserted the hunt and instead hopped on top of the hippo for a ride.  Other pygmies in the scene are fishing, reaping the plenty that the Nile provides during its flood. 

            The beautiful green flora and fauna, along with that of the river itself and the crocodile are actually made with a colored glass. I found this to be incredibly exciting because in most of the books that I’ve been reading, I’ve come away with the sense that colored glass, or smalti, did not develop until later on in more medieval times.  However, if we look at the date for this mosaic (2nd century) and the date for many of the glass Christian mosaics are starting in the 300’s, and then it is not so surprising that there were some glass techniques used during the time when this mosaic was made.  Stone tile, however, was much more popular.  It was not until after the fall of Rome and the rise of Christendom that glass became the favored material used in mosaics.  The broad spectrum of colors available can be seen most clearly in the birds that border the main Nilotic scene.  The reds, oranges, purples and greens are all very vibrant and add a beautiful liveliness to the birds.  Comparing this bright scene with another Nilotic scene down the hall from this one (same time period) which is done in mostly black and white tile, one can appreciate the hard work of the artist in this one perhaps a bit more because of his attention to detail and his desire to strive for colorful stones that reflect the birds they are meant to recreate.

An interesting aspect to this pavement is its complicated border.  This mosaic does not have a simple wave-crest or meander border around the main scene as one might expect.  However, it has more pictures with birds, flowers, player’s masks and geometric designs.  The border pictures even have borders of cable and wave crest designs.  The border pictures are accessible from every point of entry (meaning that you can see them the right way when you walk into the room), but are upside down upon exit.  The geometric borders twist and twine along, making the whole pavement more intricate, and are different colors in order to distinguish themselves from each other, but they still match main colors in the Nilotic scene.  It is significant that the wave crest border is chosen because it nods to the water element of the Nile.  The cable border could also be considered significant because it is endless, much like the infinity symbol, and could reflect the cyclical nature of the Nile flooding annually to bring water to the farmlands and thus ensuring another harvest.

            The bit that I do not fully understand is the presence of the player’s masks in the border.  Many scholars think that the pygmies featured in the many Nilotic scenes that have been discovered are ridiculous and a form of mockery that the Romans made of the Egyptians.  The masks could indicate that this is certainly the case.  However, there is the astute observation by Caitlin Barrett that these were indeed reflective of religious ceremonies that the Egyptians observed with the annual flooding of the Nile.  Theater itself has religious origins, dating back to the Greeks (and probably before). It could be a connecting aspect between theater and the flooding of the Nile, or it could indeed be a mockery, as the Romans did invent satire and used the Greek formula for comedy to mock certain ideas or persons.  I suppose the significance of the masks would be up to the viewer, and his or her own views on Egypt.  We do know that Rome went through a bit of an Egyptomania phase after Augustus conquered Egypt and brought it into the Empire.  Evidence of this is in the plethora of obelisks that decorate Rome and the tomb of Cestius, which is modeled after a pyramid.  This obsession and recent victory could certainly have colored the viewer’s (and the artist’s) view of the Nile and religious rites surrounding it.

Barrett, Caitlin. "Nile Inundation Theology in the Roman World: "Nilotic Scenes" from Campania" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the The 62nd Annual Meeting of the American Research Center in Egypt, Marriott Downtown, Chicago, IL, Apr 01, 2011 <Not Available>. 2014-01-10 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p495462_index.html>

(via romegreeceart)