September 16th, 2014

irefiordiligi:

Isis Ritual Ceremony - Roman fresco from Herculaneum

(via cosenoditi)

September 14th, 2014

the-fault-in-marys-life:

Archeological Museum of Paestum, Italy - just some interesting roman coins.

(via aemiliana)

September 13th, 2014

richard-miles-archaeologist:

SUMMER HIATUS

Travelling with Richard Miles:

Temple of Jupiter (pictures 1,2) and Temple of Bacchus (picture 3), Baalbek, Lebanon

(via hummusapiens)

September 12th, 2014
archaicwonder:

Roman Bronze Dice, c. 1st-3rd century AD
A pair of cuboid dice comprising: one with two large ring-and-dot motifs to each face and a smaller in each corner; one with six ring-and-dot motifs to four of its faces, one with five and another with six irregularly spaced.

archaicwonder:

Roman Bronze Dice, c. 1st-3rd century AD

A pair of cuboid dice comprising: one with two large ring-and-dot motifs to each face and a smaller in each corner; one with six ring-and-dot motifs to four of its faces, one with five and another with six irregularly spaced.

(Source: timelineauctions.com)

September 10th, 2014
archaicwonder:

Antonine Wall at Rough Castle Roman Fort, near Bonnybridge, Falkirk, Scotland
The Antonine Wall is the largest relic of the Roman occupation of Scotland. Built around AD 142, on the orders of the Emperor Antoninus Pius, it marked the northern border to the Roman Empire and was constructed as a defense against the northern tribes. It stretched from Carriden on the Forth to Old Kilpatrick on the Clyde, and was approximately 37 miles long.
Unlike the stone-built Hadrian’s Wall, the Antonine Wall consisted of a rampant of soil faced with turf, resting on a stone foundation. It originally stood 12 feet high, and was protected on the north side by a V-shaped ditch that was 40 feet wide and 12 feet deep(seen here on the left). South of the wall itself ran a cobbled road – the ‘Military Way’ – which linked a network of forts that were built along the wall at intervals of approximately 2 miles. These forts acted as barracks for troops who defended the frontier.
The Antonine Wall was constantly being attacked by the Picts and, by AD160, as the Roman Empire gradually became weaker, the Wall was abandoned as the Roman army retreated to the south.

archaicwonder:

Antonine Wall at Rough Castle Roman Fort, near Bonnybridge, Falkirk, Scotland

The Antonine Wall is the largest relic of the Roman occupation of Scotland. Built around AD 142, on the orders of the Emperor Antoninus Pius, it marked the northern border to the Roman Empire and was constructed as a defense against the northern tribes. It stretched from Carriden on the Forth to Old Kilpatrick on the Clyde, and was approximately 37 miles long.

Unlike the stone-built Hadrian’s Wall, the Antonine Wall consisted of a rampant of soil faced with turf, resting on a stone foundation. It originally stood 12 feet high, and was protected on the north side by a V-shaped ditch that was 40 feet wide and 12 feet deep(seen here on the left). South of the wall itself ran a cobbled road – the ‘Military Way’ – which linked a network of forts that were built along the wall at intervals of approximately 2 miles. These forts acted as barracks for troops who defended the frontier.

The Antonine Wall was constantly being attacked by the Picts and, by AD160, as the Roman Empire gradually became weaker, the Wall was abandoned as the Roman army retreated to the south.

(Source: Flickr / kenny_barker, via natamoriensque)

September 5th, 2014

Hadrian’s Wall dig unearths Roman stylus wax tablet

archaeologicalnews:

image

Archaeologists have unearthed a stylus wax tablet at the site of a Roman fort on Hadrian’s Wall in Northumberland.

Believed to be from 105-120AD, the tablet was found just 12in (30cm) from a wooden toilet seat discovered at the same location last month.

The tablet is one of 12 found at Vindolanda this year and one of seven found from the same building level.

Director of excavations, Dr Andrew Birley, said he was “looking forward” to reading the tablet’s text.

The site, near Hexham, has previously revealed gold and silver coins and other artefacts of the Roman army. Read more.

ancientart:

Details from the Roman Arch of Constantine, dedicated in AD 312. This triumphal arch is situated between the Palatine Hill and Colosseum in Rome, and was built by the Senate to commemorate the victory of Constantine the Great in the Battle of Milvian Bridge.

Photos taken by Steve James.

(via bantigernae)

September 1st, 2014
clioancientart:

Etruscan painted terracotta cinerary urn (urn for the ashes of the deceased) with a figure of a reclining man on the lid and a molded panel of a combat scene on the chest. From Chiusi, Italy. About 150 to 100 BC. Note the man’s gold finger ring and libation cup. The name of a woman, Thana Ancaruri Thelesa, is painted on the chest. Whatever her relation to the deceased man, she may have paid to have this made. Now in The British Museum, London. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities

clioancientart:

Etruscan painted terracotta cinerary urn (urn for the ashes of the deceased) with a figure of a reclining man on the lid and a molded panel of a combat scene on the chest. From Chiusi, Italy. About 150 to 100 BC. Note the man’s gold finger ring and libation cup. The name of a woman, Thana Ancaruri Thelesa, is painted on the chest. Whatever her relation to the deceased man, she may have paid to have this made. Now in The British Museum, London. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities

(via romegreeceart)

August 18th, 2014
archaicwonder:

Roman Gateway to Patara, Turkey
Ancient Patara was a wealthy port city at the mouth of the Xanthos River. It was said to have been founded by Patarus, a son of Apollo. The city was noted in antiquity for its temple and oracle of Apollo, second only to that of Delphi.
Patara was originally a Lycian settlement and then served as an important naval base during the wars of Alexander the Great’s successors. It later became part of the Lycian League and then a thriving port within the Roman Empire. Sometime during the Middle Ages the harbour of Patara silted up, rendering the port useless.

archaicwonder:

Roman Gateway to Patara, Turkey

Ancient Patara was a wealthy port city at the mouth of the Xanthos River. It was said to have been founded by Patarus, a son of Apollo. The city was noted in antiquity for its temple and oracle of Apollo, second only to that of Delphi.

Patara was originally a Lycian settlement and then served as an important naval base during the wars of Alexander the Great’s successors. It later became part of the Lycian League and then a thriving port within the Roman Empire. Sometime during the Middle Ages the harbour of Patara silted up, rendering the port useless.

(via theancientworld)

July 9th, 2014

Tarquinia - Necropolis of Monterozzi

Some beautiful Etruscan frescoes founded in the Necropolis of Tarquinia (the ancient Tarchuna).

The necropolis has about 6,000 graves, the oldest of which dates to the 7th century BCE. About 200 of the gravestones are decorated with frescos. During the course of the IV century B.C. Tarquinia began to produce paintings on the inside of its tombs, a cultural sight unique to them at the time, something which in 2004, lead them to became part of the world’s heritage under UNESCO.

(Source: irefiordiligi, via honeyed-oak)

The Baths of Caracalla

Elaborate public baths constructed by the Emperor Caracalla around 216 CE, were a center of Roman social life and one of the great engineering triumphs of the 3rd Century. Sprawling over some 33 acres on Rome’s outskirts, the baths were a vast complex of business and entertainment establishments. At the center of everything were the baths themselves - a “frigidarium” (cold bath), several “tepidaria” (warm baths) and a “calidarium” (steam bath); most bathers passed through them in that order. Aqueducts fed thousands of gallons of mountain water into the system. Water for the tepidaria and calidarium  was heated by the wood-burning furnaces connected to a network of steam pipes beneath the floors.  The baths would remain in use until the 6th century when Goths destroyed aqueducts that supplied the baths with water. 

(Source: last-of-the-romans, via honeyed-oak)

July 3rd, 2014

ancientart:

A quick look at: the genius. What was the genius, and how can we view this aspect of Roman domestic religion in ancient art?

genius (pl. genii) was the divine spirit which the Romans believed every human male was born with; the corresponding guardian spirit in women was called Juno. The genius of the male watched over him throughout his life, and enabled him to beget children. The significance of the genius took on particular importance due to the structure of Roman families.

The Roman family was centered around the paterfamilias, whom was the oldest male member of the family. Everyone within this family was under his control. No major decisions of the family were made without the consent of the paterfamilias, he had control over the property of the family, and for much of Roman history, he had the power of life and death over members of his household. Thus, understandably, the wellbeing of the genius of the paterfamilias was crucial for his entire family, particularly as it was thought to guide the decisions he made. Members of the family would give offerings, and make appeals to the genius of the paterfamilias. Offerings were made on domestic altars (larariums), which nearly every Roman household possessed.

These larariums were usually built in the atrium or kitchen of the home (for an example of a lararium, see this photo from the House of Golden Cupids), and would contain a statuette of the genius (photos 2 & 3). Larariums could also be painted, such as shown in the House of the Vettii at Pompeii (photo 1). Here, we can see the genius figure in the middle, with two lares (household guardian spirits) on either side, to whom offerings were also made. The house snake was also a symbol of the genius, and is often present iconographically in Roman domestic art. These genius figures, be it statuette or painting, are typically depicted as a young, veiled man wearing a toga, whom usually holds a patera and/ or a cornucopia.

The first image is taken by Patricio Lorente via the Wiki Commons, and the shown statuette is courtesy of the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, USA (54.2329). This figure is made of bronze with silver inlay, and dates to the 1st century.

(via yolo-are-avi-atum)

June 21st, 2014

gildedhistory:

Hairstyles of Ancient Rome

"Hairstyle fashion in Rome was ever changing, and particularly in the Roman Imperial Period there were a number of different ways to style hair. Much the same with clothes, there were several hairstyles that were limited to certain people in ancient society. Styles are so distinctive they allow scholars today to create a chronology of Roman portraiture and art; we are able to date pictures of the empresses on coins, or identify busts depending on their hairstyles."

"Busts themselves could have detachable wigs. There have been many suggestions as to why some busts have been created with detachable wigs and some without. Perhaps the main reason was to keep the bust looking up-to-date. It would have been too expensive to commission a new bust every time hair fashion changed, so a mix-and-match bust would have been preferable for women with less money." [X]

(via aemiliana)