August 18th, 2014
archaicwonder:

Roman Gateway to Patara, Turkey
Ancient Patara was a wealthy port city at the mouth of the Xanthos River. It was said to have been founded by Patarus, a son of Apollo. The city was noted in antiquity for its temple and oracle of Apollo, second only to that of Delphi.
Patara was originally a Lycian settlement and then served as an important naval base during the wars of Alexander the Great’s successors. It later became part of the Lycian League and then a thriving port within the Roman Empire. Sometime during the Middle Ages the harbour of Patara silted up, rendering the port useless.

archaicwonder:

Roman Gateway to Patara, Turkey

Ancient Patara was a wealthy port city at the mouth of the Xanthos River. It was said to have been founded by Patarus, a son of Apollo. The city was noted in antiquity for its temple and oracle of Apollo, second only to that of Delphi.

Patara was originally a Lycian settlement and then served as an important naval base during the wars of Alexander the Great’s successors. It later became part of the Lycian League and then a thriving port within the Roman Empire. Sometime during the Middle Ages the harbour of Patara silted up, rendering the port useless.

(via theancientworld)

July 9th, 2014

Tarquinia - Necropolis of Monterozzi

Some beautiful Etruscan frescoes founded in the Necropolis of Tarquinia (the ancient Tarchuna).

The necropolis has about 6,000 graves, the oldest of which dates to the 7th century BCE. About 200 of the gravestones are decorated with frescos. During the course of the IV century B.C. Tarquinia began to produce paintings on the inside of its tombs, a cultural sight unique to them at the time, something which in 2004, lead them to became part of the world’s heritage under UNESCO.

(Source: irefiordiligi, via honeyed-oak)

The Baths of Caracalla

Elaborate public baths constructed by the Emperor Caracalla around 216 CE, were a center of Roman social life and one of the great engineering triumphs of the 3rd Century. Sprawling over some 33 acres on Rome’s outskirts, the baths were a vast complex of business and entertainment establishments. At the center of everything were the baths themselves - a “frigidarium” (cold bath), several “tepidaria” (warm baths) and a “calidarium” (steam bath); most bathers passed through them in that order. Aqueducts fed thousands of gallons of mountain water into the system. Water for the tepidaria and calidarium  was heated by the wood-burning furnaces connected to a network of steam pipes beneath the floors.  The baths would remain in use until the 6th century when Goths destroyed aqueducts that supplied the baths with water. 

(Source: last-of-the-romans, via honeyed-oak)

July 3rd, 2014

ancientart:

A quick look at: the genius. What was the genius, and how can we view this aspect of Roman domestic religion in ancient art?

genius (pl. genii) was the divine spirit which the Romans believed every human male was born with; the corresponding guardian spirit in women was called Juno. The genius of the male watched over him throughout his life, and enabled him to beget children. The significance of the genius took on particular importance due to the structure of Roman families.

The Roman family was centered around the paterfamilias, whom was the oldest male member of the family. Everyone within this family was under his control. No major decisions of the family were made without the consent of the paterfamilias, he had control over the property of the family, and for much of Roman history, he had the power of life and death over members of his household. Thus, understandably, the wellbeing of the genius of the paterfamilias was crucial for his entire family, particularly as it was thought to guide the decisions he made. Members of the family would give offerings, and make appeals to the genius of the paterfamilias. Offerings were made on domestic altars (larariums), which nearly every Roman household possessed.

These larariums were usually built in the atrium or kitchen of the home (for an example of a lararium, see this photo from the House of Golden Cupids), and would contain a statuette of the genius (photos 2 & 3). Larariums could also be painted, such as shown in the House of the Vettii at Pompeii (photo 1). Here, we can see the genius figure in the middle, with two lares (household guardian spirits) on either side, to whom offerings were also made. The house snake was also a symbol of the genius, and is often present iconographically in Roman domestic art. These genius figures, be it statuette or painting, are typically depicted as a young, veiled man wearing a toga, whom usually holds a patera and/ or a cornucopia.

The first image is taken by Patricio Lorente via the Wiki Commons, and the shown statuette is courtesy of the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, USA (54.2329). This figure is made of bronze with silver inlay, and dates to the 1st century.

(via yolo-are-avi-atum)

June 21st, 2014

gildedhistory:

Hairstyles of Ancient Rome

"Hairstyle fashion in Rome was ever changing, and particularly in the Roman Imperial Period there were a number of different ways to style hair. Much the same with clothes, there were several hairstyles that were limited to certain people in ancient society. Styles are so distinctive they allow scholars today to create a chronology of Roman portraiture and art; we are able to date pictures of the empresses on coins, or identify busts depending on their hairstyles."

"Busts themselves could have detachable wigs. There have been many suggestions as to why some busts have been created with detachable wigs and some without. Perhaps the main reason was to keep the bust looking up-to-date. It would have been too expensive to commission a new bust every time hair fashion changed, so a mix-and-match bust would have been preferable for women with less money." [X]

(via aemiliana)

June 15th, 2014
just-wanna-travel:

Beit She’an, Israel

just-wanna-travel:

Beit She’an, Israel

(via ancientromebuildings)

June 14th, 2014

thegetty:

Prep for a Roman meal served up in A.D. 50.

Hope you’re hungry for wild game in a spicy, garlicky sauce. The vast extent of the Roman Empire made many “exotic” ingredients easy to obtain (if you were wealthy enough).

Wall Fragment with a Scene of Meal Preparation, A.D. 50 - 75, Unknown. Roman, Italy. J. Paul Getty Museum.

(via ancientart)

June 12th, 2014
historicaldetailsandstuff:

Neptune and creatures of the sea, detail of a floor mosaic in the Baths of Neptune, Ostia, Italy, ca. 140 AD. 
Black-and-white floor mosaics were very popular during the second and third centuries. The artists conceived them as surface decorations, not as illusionistic compositions meant to rival paintings.

historicaldetailsandstuff:

Neptune and creatures of the sea, detail of a floor mosaic in the Baths of Neptune, Ostia, Italy, ca. 140 AD.

Black-and-white floor mosaics were very popular during the second and third centuries. The artists conceived them as surface decorations, not as illusionistic compositions meant to rival paintings.

(via romegreeceart)

June 11th, 2014
greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Ancient Corinth:

Tessellated mosaic depicting a pastoral scene. Part of a larger floor from a Roman villa found near Kokkinovrysi (c 150-200 A.D)

greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Ancient Corinth:

Tessellated mosaic depicting a pastoral scene. Part of a larger floor from a Roman villa found near Kokkinovrysi (c 150-200 A.D)

(via romegreeceart)

June 8th, 2014
archaeologybabe:

Pretorians of Augustus, 1st century AD.

archaeologybabe:

Pretorians of Augustus, 1st century AD.

(via romegreeceart)

June 1st, 2014
fuckyesitaly:

Sunrays on the Ancient Appian Way

fuckyesitaly:

Sunrays on the Ancient Appian Way

(via honeyed-oak)

kimberlite8:

interretialia:

Ancient Roman Dogtag,

Inscription Reads: “Hold me if I am lost and return me to my master Viventius on the estate of Callistus”

~~~

TENE ME NE
FVGIA[M] ET REVO
CA ME AD DOM[I]NVM
EV VIVENTIVM IN
AR[E]A CALLISTI

Ugh the ancient Romans were too cute. Classicist feels explosion.

(via terrasigillata)

May 26th, 2014

femalenudityinwesternpainting:

"Three Graces", "A Bacchian Rite" (Mural in the Villa dei Misteri of Pompeii, Italy), "Venus Anadyomene" (Mural in the Casa della Venere of Pompeii, Italy), "Nereid On A Panther", "Nereid On A Sea Horse" (Except 2nd and 3rd, these Murals were all from Pompeii, Italy, now in the Naples National Archaeological Museum)

Anonymus (1st century), Roman Empire

(The 3rd mural might be a Roman copy of the work of great Greek painter Apelles of 4th century BC, whose ‘Venus Anadyomene’ was modeled after Campaspe, the mistress of Alexander the Great.)

(via romegreeceart)

May 17th, 2014

records-of-fortune:

records-of-fortune:

Amphitheatre of El Jem. (Classical Thysdrus) c. 238 AD.

Set on a plain in the middle of Tunisia, this Imperial Roman amphitheatre is constructed entirely of stone blocks, and has been built with no foundations, making it completely free standing and supported by a complex vaulting system. This makes it of a rare type, and the only instance of such construction to be found in Africa, as most amphitheatres from Imperial Roman provinces were built against hillsides for structural support.
It is judged to have the capacity for 35,000 spectators, making it one of the largest amphitheatres in the world. It is one of the most impressive legacies of Roman provincial governance in Africa, and speaks of the prosperity of the area under Imperial rule.
In a fantastic state of conservation, the Amphitheatre of El Jem retains most of its architectural and architectonic components. In 238 AD Gordian I began construction, and although never fully completed, due to political rivalries and fund shortages, the amphitheatre marks the prosperity of Thysdrus, a place which first flourished under the Emperor Hadrian and became a centre for olive oil manufacture.

In later history, the amphitheatre has been used as a stronghold against Arab invaders, a citadel, and a hiding place for dissidents, and has been subjected to cannon fire, quarrying and explosions.

World Heritage states that “The monument of El Jem is one of the most accomplished examples of Roman amphitheatre construction, approximating to the status of the Colosseum in Rome.”

I made a mistake in the original post and have since corrected it. The emperor responsible was Gordian I, or Marcus Antonius Gordianus Sempronianus Romanus Africanus, if you’re feeling formal.
Sorry about that!

(Source: whc.unesco.org, via fuckyeahancientclassics)