October 20th, 2014

greek-museums:

Archaeological Museum of Thessaloniki:

A selection of mosaics found throughout Thessaloniki, displayed in a reconstruction of a Roman residence situated at the garden of the museum. (4th century AD)

Mosaics appear in greek space during prehistoric times and up until the Hellenistic period they are constructed with colourful pebbles. During the Roman period we have the appearance of “tesserae”, the cube tiles made of a variety of materials. Motifs range from floral and geometrical designs to elaborate scenes taken from mythology.

All I can think is that these designs would make some truly great carpets.

(via et-haec)

September 26th, 2014

House of the Skeleton. Herculaneum

(Source: last-of-the-romans, via bantigernae)

ancientpeoples:

Marble Statue of a member of the Imperial family
27 BC - AD 68
Augustan or Julio Claudian
 Statues of members of the imperial family, both living and already deceased, were often displayed together in public spaces such as the forum of a city, a basilica, or the theatre.
(Source: The Met Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Marble Statue of a member of the Imperial family

27 BC - AD 68

Augustan or Julio Claudian

 Statues of members of the imperial family, both living and already deceased, were often displayed together in public spaces such as the forum of a city, a basilica, or the theatre.

(Source: The Met Museum)

September 17th, 2014

Thank you for putting up with my accidental reblogs of cats onto this blog. 

archaeology:

NB: If you want to see the famous Garden Room frescoes, you still have to go to the Palazzo Massimo in Rome.

September 16th, 2014

irefiordiligi:

Isis Ritual Ceremony - Roman fresco from Herculaneum

(via cosenoditea)

September 14th, 2014

the-fault-in-marys-life:

Archeological Museum of Paestum, Italy - just some interesting roman coins.

(via aemiliana)

September 13th, 2014

richard-miles-archaeologist:

SUMMER HIATUS

Travelling with Richard Miles:

Temple of Jupiter (pictures 1,2) and Temple of Bacchus (picture 3), Baalbek, Lebanon

(via hummusapiens)

September 12th, 2014
archaicwonder:

Roman Bronze Dice, c. 1st-3rd century AD
A pair of cuboid dice comprising: one with two large ring-and-dot motifs to each face and a smaller in each corner; one with six ring-and-dot motifs to four of its faces, one with five and another with six irregularly spaced.

archaicwonder:

Roman Bronze Dice, c. 1st-3rd century AD

A pair of cuboid dice comprising: one with two large ring-and-dot motifs to each face and a smaller in each corner; one with six ring-and-dot motifs to four of its faces, one with five and another with six irregularly spaced.

(Source: timelineauctions.com)

September 10th, 2014
archaicwonder:

Antonine Wall at Rough Castle Roman Fort, near Bonnybridge, Falkirk, Scotland
The Antonine Wall is the largest relic of the Roman occupation of Scotland. Built around AD 142, on the orders of the Emperor Antoninus Pius, it marked the northern border to the Roman Empire and was constructed as a defense against the northern tribes. It stretched from Carriden on the Forth to Old Kilpatrick on the Clyde, and was approximately 37 miles long.
Unlike the stone-built Hadrian’s Wall, the Antonine Wall consisted of a rampant of soil faced with turf, resting on a stone foundation. It originally stood 12 feet high, and was protected on the north side by a V-shaped ditch that was 40 feet wide and 12 feet deep(seen here on the left). South of the wall itself ran a cobbled road – the ‘Military Way’ – which linked a network of forts that were built along the wall at intervals of approximately 2 miles. These forts acted as barracks for troops who defended the frontier.
The Antonine Wall was constantly being attacked by the Picts and, by AD160, as the Roman Empire gradually became weaker, the Wall was abandoned as the Roman army retreated to the south.

archaicwonder:

Antonine Wall at Rough Castle Roman Fort, near Bonnybridge, Falkirk, Scotland

The Antonine Wall is the largest relic of the Roman occupation of Scotland. Built around AD 142, on the orders of the Emperor Antoninus Pius, it marked the northern border to the Roman Empire and was constructed as a defense against the northern tribes. It stretched from Carriden on the Forth to Old Kilpatrick on the Clyde, and was approximately 37 miles long.

Unlike the stone-built Hadrian’s Wall, the Antonine Wall consisted of a rampant of soil faced with turf, resting on a stone foundation. It originally stood 12 feet high, and was protected on the north side by a V-shaped ditch that was 40 feet wide and 12 feet deep(seen here on the left). South of the wall itself ran a cobbled road – the ‘Military Way’ – which linked a network of forts that were built along the wall at intervals of approximately 2 miles. These forts acted as barracks for troops who defended the frontier.

The Antonine Wall was constantly being attacked by the Picts and, by AD160, as the Roman Empire gradually became weaker, the Wall was abandoned as the Roman army retreated to the south.

(Source: Flickr / kenny_barker, via natamoriensque)

September 5th, 2014

Hadrian’s Wall dig unearths Roman stylus wax tablet

archaeologicalnews:

image

Archaeologists have unearthed a stylus wax tablet at the site of a Roman fort on Hadrian’s Wall in Northumberland.

Believed to be from 105-120AD, the tablet was found just 12in (30cm) from a wooden toilet seat discovered at the same location last month.

The tablet is one of 12 found at Vindolanda this year and one of seven found from the same building level.

Director of excavations, Dr Andrew Birley, said he was “looking forward” to reading the tablet’s text.

The site, near Hexham, has previously revealed gold and silver coins and other artefacts of the Roman army. Read more.

ancientart:

Details from the Roman Arch of Constantine, dedicated in AD 312. This triumphal arch is situated between the Palatine Hill and Colosseum in Rome, and was built by the Senate to commemorate the victory of Constantine the Great in the Battle of Milvian Bridge.

Photos taken by Steve James.

(via bantigernae)

September 1st, 2014
clioancientart:

Etruscan painted terracotta cinerary urn (urn for the ashes of the deceased) with a figure of a reclining man on the lid and a molded panel of a combat scene on the chest. From Chiusi, Italy. About 150 to 100 BC. Note the man’s gold finger ring and libation cup. The name of a woman, Thana Ancaruri Thelesa, is painted on the chest. Whatever her relation to the deceased man, she may have paid to have this made. Now in The British Museum, London. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities

clioancientart:

Etruscan painted terracotta cinerary urn (urn for the ashes of the deceased) with a figure of a reclining man on the lid and a molded panel of a combat scene on the chest. From Chiusi, Italy. About 150 to 100 BC. Note the man’s gold finger ring and libation cup. The name of a woman, Thana Ancaruri Thelesa, is painted on the chest. Whatever her relation to the deceased man, she may have paid to have this made. Now in The British Museum, London. Photo Credit: Clio Ancient Art and Antiquities

(via romegreeceart)

August 18th, 2014
archaicwonder:

Roman Gateway to Patara, Turkey
Ancient Patara was a wealthy port city at the mouth of the Xanthos River. It was said to have been founded by Patarus, a son of Apollo. The city was noted in antiquity for its temple and oracle of Apollo, second only to that of Delphi.
Patara was originally a Lycian settlement and then served as an important naval base during the wars of Alexander the Great’s successors. It later became part of the Lycian League and then a thriving port within the Roman Empire. Sometime during the Middle Ages the harbour of Patara silted up, rendering the port useless.

archaicwonder:

Roman Gateway to Patara, Turkey

Ancient Patara was a wealthy port city at the mouth of the Xanthos River. It was said to have been founded by Patarus, a son of Apollo. The city was noted in antiquity for its temple and oracle of Apollo, second only to that of Delphi.

Patara was originally a Lycian settlement and then served as an important naval base during the wars of Alexander the Great’s successors. It later became part of the Lycian League and then a thriving port within the Roman Empire. Sometime during the Middle Ages the harbour of Patara silted up, rendering the port useless.

(via theancientworld)

July 9th, 2014

Tarquinia - Necropolis of Monterozzi

Some beautiful Etruscan frescoes founded in the Necropolis of Tarquinia (the ancient Tarchuna).

The necropolis has about 6,000 graves, the oldest of which dates to the 7th century BCE. About 200 of the gravestones are decorated with frescos. During the course of the IV century B.C. Tarquinia began to produce paintings on the inside of its tombs, a cultural sight unique to them at the time, something which in 2004, lead them to became part of the world’s heritage under UNESCO.

(Source: irefiordiligi, via honeyed-oak)