April 19th, 2014
femalenudityinwesternpainting:

“The Dance Of Bacchante” (Mural from a tomb in Villa Pamphili of Rome, Italy, now in the British Museum) by
Anonymus (1st century), Roman Empire

femalenudityinwesternpainting:

“The Dance Of Bacchante” (Mural from a tomb in Villa Pamphili of Rome, Italy, now in the British Museum) by

Anonymus (1st century), Roman Empire

(via hiphopocliedes)

April 17th, 2014
riley-the-redd:

Tomb of the Infernal Four-Horses Chariot, Etruscan necropolis of Pianacce, 4th century BC. 

riley-the-redd:

Tomb of the Infernal Four-Horses Chariot, Etruscan necropolis of Pianacce, 4th century BC. 

(Source: old-lady-bitch, via hehasawifeyouknow)

April 16th, 2014
bhollen8:

Ara Pacis, Rome

bhollen8:

Ara Pacis, Rome

(via romegreeceart)

April 8th, 2014
issahessa:

The narrow streets of Pompeii…

issahessa:

The narrow streets of Pompeii…

(via galatea-wannabe)

ancientpeoples:

Earring in the shape of a fish
2nd Century AD
Roman
(Source: The British Museum)

ancientpeoples:

Earring in the shape of a fish

2nd Century AD

Roman

(Source: The British Museum)

April 4th, 2014
April 1st, 2014
ancientart:

A quick look at: Acueducto de los Milagros, Mérida, Spain.
This Roman aqueduct was dubbed Acueducto de los Milagros ("Miraculous Aqueduct") by the inhabitants of Mérida for the fact that it was still standing, and for the ewe that it evoked. 
This aqueduct was located in the Roman colony of Emerita Augusta (present day Mérida), which was founded by Augustus Caesar in 25 BC. The construction of the aqueduct itself is thought to have taken place during the 1st century AD, with later construction or renovations occurring around 300 AD. 
The structure was built to supply water to Emerita Augusta. This water was originally brought to the city from Lago de Proserpina -a reservoir which was fed by the Las Pardillas stream, about 5km north-west of Mérida. 38 pillars which stand 25 metres high along some 830 metres remains today. The structure is constructed from opus mixtum. 
The Romans constructed aqueducts to supply water from distant sources to their towns and cities, supplying public baths, private households, etc. Water was moved by the aqueducts through gravity, the aqueducts were built on an ever-so-slight downward gradient. This diagram is useful in showing how Roman aqueducts worked. 
Photo courtesy & taken by Jane Drumsara.

ancientart:

A quick look at: Acueducto de los MilagrosMérida, Spain.

This Roman aqueduct was dubbed Acueducto de los Milagros ("Miraculous Aqueduct") by the inhabitants of Mérida for the fact that it was still standing, and for the ewe that it evoked. 

This aqueduct was located in the Roman colony of Emerita Augusta (present day Mérida), which was founded by Augustus Caesar in 25 BC. The construction of the aqueduct itself is thought to have taken place during the 1st century AD, with later construction or renovations occurring around 300 AD.

The structure was built to supply water to Emerita Augusta. This water was originally brought to the city from Lago de Proserpina -a reservoir which was fed by the Las Pardillas stream, about 5km north-west of Mérida. 38 pillars which stand 25 metres high along some 830 metres remains today. The structure is constructed from opus mixtum

The Romans constructed aqueducts to supply water from distant sources to their towns and cities, supplying public baths, private households, etc. Water was moved by the aqueducts through gravity, the aqueducts were built on an ever-so-slight downward gradient. This diagram is useful in showing how Roman aqueducts worked. 

Photo courtesy & taken by Jane Drumsara.

March 10th, 2014

ancientart:

Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa, Hunedoara, Romania.

The largest, and capital city of Roman Dacia, this city was founded by Terentius Scaurianus about 108-110, during the reign of Roman emperor Hadrian.

Situated less than 50km away from the former capital of the Dacians, Ulpia Traiana Sarmizegetusa was built on a strategic point  between where the battle of the Dacian troops and Roman legions took place. This site is on the ground of what was a camp of the Fifth Macedonian Legion, and was settled by veterans of the Dacian wars.

Later destroyed by the Goths, this large cosmopolitan centre remains in ruins today. The site features temples, gladiator schools, a large forum, and an amphitheater.

While researching this site I also found these virtual reconstructions of what features of this site would have once looked like:

Photos taken by Codrinb.

March 5th, 2014
archaicwonder:

Timgad, Algeria
Timgad was founded ex nihilo as a military colony by the Emperor Trajan around AD 100. It was intended to serve, primarily, as a bastion against the Berbers in the nearby Aures Mountains. It was originally populated largely by Parthian veterans of the Roman army who were granted lands in return for years of service. The ruins are noteworthy for representing one of the best extant examples of the grid plan as used in Roman city planning.
Located at the intersection of six roads, the city was walled but not fortified. Originally designed for a population of around 15,000, the city quickly outgrew its original specifications and spilled beyond the orthogonal grid in a more loosely organized fashion.
The city enjoyed a peaceful existence for the first several hundred years and became a center of Christian activity starting in the 3rd century, and a Donatist center in the 4th century. In the 5th century, the city was sacked by the Vandals before falling into decline. In AD 535 the Byzantine general Solomon found the city when he came to occupy it. In the following century, the city was briefly repopulated as a primarily Christian city before being sacked by Berbers in the 7th century and being abandoned.
Because no new settlements were founded on the site after the 7th century, sacking, it was partially preserved under sand up to a depth of approximately one meter until it was excavated in 1881. The encroachment of the Sahara on the ruins was the principal reason why the town is so well preserved. The site of Timgad is located about 22 miles east of the town of Batna in the Aures Mountains of Algeria.

archaicwonder:

Timgad, Algeria

Timgad was founded ex nihilo as a military colony by the Emperor Trajan around AD 100. It was intended to serve, primarily, as a bastion against the Berbers in the nearby Aures Mountains. It was originally populated largely by Parthian veterans of the Roman army who were granted lands in return for years of service. The ruins are noteworthy for representing one of the best extant examples of the grid plan as used in Roman city planning.

Located at the intersection of six roads, the city was walled but not fortified. Originally designed for a population of around 15,000, the city quickly outgrew its original specifications and spilled beyond the orthogonal grid in a more loosely organized fashion.

The city enjoyed a peaceful existence for the first several hundred years and became a center of Christian activity starting in the 3rd century, and a Donatist center in the 4th century. In the 5th century, the city was sacked by the Vandals before falling into decline. In AD 535 the Byzantine general Solomon found the city when he came to occupy it. In the following century, the city was briefly repopulated as a primarily Christian city before being sacked by Berbers in the 7th century and being abandoned.

Because no new settlements were founded on the site after the 7th century, sacking, it was partially preserved under sand up to a depth of approximately one meter until it was excavated in 1881. The encroachment of the Sahara on the ruins was the principal reason why the town is so well preserved. The site of Timgad is located about 22 miles east of the town of Batna in the Aures Mountains of Algeria.

March 2nd, 2014
February 28th, 2014
archaicwonder:

The famous ‘Elephant Denarius’ of Julius Caesar, struck in a traveling mint, c. 49-48 BC
On the obverse is a group of religious symbols including a simpulum (libation ladle), an aspergillum (implement used to sprinkle holy water), an axe surmounted by a wolf’s head, and an apex (hat). On the reverse, an Elephant advancing right, trampling on a horned serpent, CAESAR inscription below.
It is estimated that 22 million of these were minted, making them the third most minted coin of the Roman Republic and enough to pay eight legions. This coin coincides with the time when Caesar took gold and silver bouillon from the Temple of Saturn treasury in Rome, which is likely the source of the metals used in this coinage.
It has been suggested that Caesar’s use of the elephant was intended to humiliate the self-important Pompey, who had tried to associate himself with Alexander the Great by riding one of Alexander’s symbols, the elephant, in his triumphal procession. Pompey had embarrassingly failed to fit the beast into the city.
The religious symbols associate Caesar with his prestigious pontifical position as the head of Rome’s religious hierarchy. Caesar had been Pontifex Maximus since 63 BC.

archaicwonder:

The famous ‘Elephant Denarius’ of Julius Caesar, struck in a traveling mint, c. 49-48 BC

On the obverse is a group of religious symbols including a simpulum (libation ladle), an aspergillum (implement used to sprinkle holy water), an axe surmounted by a wolf’s head, and an apex (hat). On the reverse, an Elephant advancing right, trampling on a horned serpent, CAESAR inscription below.

It is estimated that 22 million of these were minted, making them the third most minted coin of the Roman Republic and enough to pay eight legions. This coin coincides with the time when Caesar took gold and silver bouillon from the Temple of Saturn treasury in Rome, which is likely the source of the metals used in this coinage.

It has been suggested that Caesar’s use of the elephant was intended to humiliate the self-important Pompey, who had tried to associate himself with Alexander the Great by riding one of Alexander’s symbols, the elephant, in his triumphal procession. Pompey had embarrassingly failed to fit the beast into the city.

The religious symbols associate Caesar with his prestigious pontifical position as the head of Rome’s religious hierarchy. Caesar had been Pontifex Maximus since 63 BC.

(via fuckyeahancientclassics)

cmsolberg:

Villa Adriana. Tivoli. 

(via ancientromebuildings)

February 20th, 2014

lapetitesauvageonne:

Ruins of Baalbek in the snow (Temple of Jupiter)

Photo cred: AFP

(Source: , via garguillian)

February 19th, 2014

pompeii + wall painting details / july 2013

(Source: daeenerys, via golemette)

February 18th, 2014

ancientart:

Baths of the Forum, Pompeii, 1895 survey expedition photographs.

After the earthquake of A.D. 62, these baths were the only ones in Pompeii still functioning, and were not severely damaged. Built not long after the establishment of Sulla’s colony in 80 B.C., these baths are relatively small, and would likely have been very overcrowded. 

Photos courtesy Brooklyn Museum Archives, Goodyear Archival Collection.

(via hehasawifeyouknow)